Full Programme

Filter

Kime Ani (audio documentary)

Thursday 24 – Sunday 27 October
All Day
Unticketed

Kime Ani, in the Tahltan language, means ‘home coming’ or ‘let’s go home’. It is a seven-part electronic work, sampling audio from recordings of three generations of artist Edzi’u’s matriarchs and grandmothers’ stories, recorded as early as 2017 and as late as 30 years ago. Edzi’u’s songs are vessels of history, tradition, and adaptation; a record of Indigenous experience through a contemporary Indigenous lens.

Edzi’u is a mixed race Tahltan and inland Tlingit artist, songwriter and composer. Her songs are an incarnation of her family’s ancient tradition of storytelling, realized by designing sound through vintage and current audio recordings, electronic instruments and the voice.

Kime Ani will be free to listen to throughout the festival weekend at sound stations.

Info

Posted: 3 October 2019

Tags:

Opening Event: Jay Bernard – Surge

In 1981 a fire broke out at a house in New Cross. Thirteen young black people died and the political events that followed would have a dramatic effect on our understanding of what it means to be Black and British.

Inspired by that story, Surge is a poetic exploration of what came after – the resistance, activism and changing notions of the state, the body and the city, narrated by the ghosts of the fire. Rooted in the area’s local history, this is a show that imaginatively blends the personal and the political, tracing a line from Thatcherism, the colour bar and the National Front to our current age of Brexit, Grenfell and May.

Join Jay Bernard, winner of the 2017 Ted Hughes Award, as they explore this important history using poetry, archive film and audio.

Produced by Speaking Volumes Live Literature Productions.

Followed by a conversation with Jay about their work and the themes explored.

14+ accompanied by an adult.

Before the performance, join us for a drink at our opening reception, from 18.45 in the CCA Atrium, generously sponsored by Drygate Brewing Co.

Info

Posted: 3 October 2019

Tags:

Chão

Made over a period of four years, Chão documents the lives of a group of landless workers in the Brazilian state of Goiás. Since 2015, the workers have occupied a portion of a factory site and demanded land reform. The film provides insights into the group’s everyday routine, divided between tilling the land, political activism and talk of what a better future might look like – delving into the microstructures of local political action and life in the resistance.

It was only recently that Jair Bolsonaro, the new president of Brazil, added the landless to the list of enemies of the nation and called on landowners to take up arms to defend their property.

SCOTTISH PREMIERE

Info

Posted: 3 October 2019

Tags:

Mothers of the Land & Mass Seed Deposit with Glasgow Seed Library

Mothers of the Land is an indigenous made film accompanying five women from the Andean highlands of Peru in their daily struggle to maintain a traditional and organic way of working the land.

Peru is predicted to be among the three countries most affected by climate change. Farmers in the region use both traditional and modern agricultural techniques to maximize clean energy and combat extreme changes in weather.

Followed by a workshop with Glasgow Seed Library. Bring your saved seeds for a Mass Seed Deposit, hear from people passionate about seed saving and pick up some skills and techniques. We invite everyone interested in resilience and food sovereignty to get involved.

UK PREMIERE

This screening will be captioned for D/deaf and Hard of Hearing audiences.
Supported by Film Hub Scotland, part of the BFI’s Film Audience Network, and funded by Screen Scotland and Lottery funding from the BFI.

Glasgow Seed Library is a collaborative project, instigated by Glasgow Community Food Network (GCFN) and the Centre for Contemporary Arts Glasgow (CCA). It has been supported by the Gaia Foundation UK Seed Sovereignty Programme.

Info

Posted: 3 October 2019

Tags:

Voices of Resistance: Performing the Communal

These five short documentaries each look at a particular community’s shared histories and realities, through collaborative and performative expressions and explorations.

We open with Kevin Jerome Everson and Claudrena N. Harold’s Black Bus Stop, a powerful, chanting tribute to an iconic gathering place for black students at the University of Virginia in the 1980s and 90s. In Cloud Forest by Eliane Bots five girls guide us through their own imaginations and impressions of their parents’ experiences of the war in the former Yugoslavia. We move to Chongqing in China for David Verbeek’s Trapped in the City of a Thousand Mountains, looking at the subculture of Chinese rap as a radical artistic expression for young people living in a surveillance state. Voices of Kidnapping by Ryan McKenna is a collection of radio broadcast recordings of family members reaching out to loved ones kidnapped in the Amazon jungle, set against abstract visuals of Colombian landscapes. We conclude with Rise by Bárbara Wagner and Benjamin de Burca, in which people from African and Caribbean descent perform in Toronto’s subway stations to reflect on their identities, creating cultural dialogue through words and rhythm.

This programme is curated and co-presented by Glasgow Short Film Festival.

Info

Posted: 3 October 2019

Tags:

Solidarity

Blacklisting in the UK construction industry impacted thousands of workers who were labelled ‘troublemakers’ for speaking out and secretively denied employment. Activists uncovered alarming links between workplace blacklisting and undercover policing. Solidarity attentively follows meetings between activists and law students, brought together for the film, revealing the determination of a community working together to find a route to justice.

Followed by a conversation with filmmaker Lucy Parker and guests.

Presented by LUX Scotland

Supported by Unite

This screening will be captioned for D/deaf and Hard of Hearing audiences and the post-film discussion will be BSL interpreted.
Supported by Film Hub Scotland, part of the BFI’s Film Audience Network,
and funded by Screen Scotland and Lottery funding from the BFI.

Info

Posted: 3 October 2019

Tags:

Lovemobil

When night falls in rural Germany, old VW caravans decorated with flashy lights line the highway roads which lead through potato fields and dark forests. Inside these buses, sex workers await their clients who are passing by. Lovemobil spends time with these women who often come from far away. A film about a microcosm that describes a society at the outer edge of globalized capitalism.

Please note this screening was originally advertised as being followed by a discussion on sex workers’ rights and migration; however this is no longer going ahead and we apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Supported by Goethe-Institute.

Info

Posted: 3 October 2019

Tags:

Last Night I Saw You Smiling

“We’re used to seeing a house for its roof, windows, and walls. But in the end, as we move out of here, it breaks my heart.” Filmmaker Kavich Neang’s father is one of the hundreds of residents who must leave the iconic White Building in Phnom Penh. This housing block bore witness to a tremendous series of events: the young nation’s Golden Age; a traumatic breakdown under a radical regime; decades of cultural revival centred within its walls; and, the rapid pace of capitalist development that would ultimately lead to its demise. Now the once radiant walls are grey and damaged. Neang, born here in 1987 and raised inside, once dreamed of shooting a fiction film here, but reality overtook his plan. It’s now the location for his first full-length documentary. When demolition comes, it’s all just a memory.

Co-presented by Aperture: Asia & Pacific Film Festival

SCOTTISH PREMIERE

 

Info

Posted: 3 October 2019

Tags:

Mental Health Focus: Haydee and the Flying Fish

Haydee has been seeking justice for victims of human rights violations for 40 years, but today she faces her most intimate battle, the end of a long trial that condemns her torturers, the murderers of the son she carried in her womb. Along the way, health problems will bring back memories of her darkest days.

The film will be followed by a discussion on the representation of trauma in cinema. Participants include Dr Leshu Torchin from University of St Andrews Department of Film Studies , Fiona Crombie of Freedom from Torture / Freedom from Torture – Glasgow group, and Dr Alison Hauenstein Swan and Dr Kirsten Atherton from the Glasgow Psychological Trauma Service.

EUROPEAN PREMIERE

This screening will be captioned for D/deaf and Hard of Hearing audiences and the post-film discussion will be BSL interpreted.
Supported by Film Hub Scotland, part of the BFI’s Film Audience Network, and funded by Screen Scotland and Lottery funding from the BFI.

Info

Posted: 3 October 2019

Tags:

Our Voice of Earth, Memory and Future

This digital restoration of Marta Rodríguez’ and Jorge Silva’s 1981 feature honours an important work of Latin American political cinema, one that doesn’t posit indigenous culture in romantic contrast to modernity, but rather recognizes in it an aesthetic of resistance.

The dominant subject of Rodríguez and Silva’s films is the centuries-long oppression of farmers and indigenous peoples in Colombia, and their equally long resistance. Nuestra voz de tierra, memoria y futuro is a film that would not exist without the critical participation of the indigenous farmers of Coconuco. Images no longer function as argumentative proof for eyewitness accounts, but rather form a tightly woven system of signs: furrows in the landscape, the backs of animals, the gestures of monuments, the myths and masks of the people and the breath that brings musical instruments to life.

UK PREMIERE (RESTORATION)

Presented in collaboration with IberoDocs

This screening will be captioned for D/deaf and Hard of Hearing audiences.
Supported by Film Hub Scotland, part of the BFI’s Film Audience Network, and funded by Screen Scotland and Lottery funding from the BFI.

Info

Posted: 3 October 2019

Tags: