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Ana Vaz: The Voyage Out

Our 2019 artist-in-focus is Ana Vaz, an artist and filmmaker whose films, installations and performances speculate upon the relationships between myth & history, self and other through a cosmology of references and perspectives. Assemblages of found and shot materials, her films combine ethnography and speculation – exploring the f(r)ictions imprinted upon ‘cultivated’ & ‘savage’ environments.

Ana joins us at the festival to present a special reading/screening around her upcoming debut feature film, The Voyage Out.

The Voyage Out takes the toxic disaster in Fukushima as a synecdoche of the impending ecological disaster and the possibility of renewal. It presents an ethnography of the future, an ethnography otherwise. Two years after the toxic disaster in Fukushima, a new island has emerged in the Ogasawara archipelago, in the far south of Japan. The Voyage Out stages, in a dreamlike and experimental form, the sensitive imaginary of these two places, and the way in which they compose a world crossed by the spectre of destruction and renewal.

Followed by a conversation between Ana and Charlotte Ashcroft (Film Hub Scotland) 

Arrows, Gazes, Points of Intensity: The Films Of Ana Vaz screens Saturday, 5:45pm

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Posted: 3 October 2019

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Critical Forum: Collaborative Research and/as Creative Practice – Storytelling through Filmmaking and Curation

Free but ticketed

This year’s Critical Forum focuses on research and/as creative and collaborative practice. Researchers who are also filmmakers and curators, who worked on stories that interrogate local and global issues, will share their experience and reflections on making or curating films on human rights. Join us for a discussion on storytelling, ethics and the challenges of getting projects off the ground.

The event will start with an illustrated talk and work in progress showcase of Freedom to Run, a running and cultural exchange project and documentary focusing on the restrictions on freedom of movement that Palestinians face by running marathons in Palestine and Scotland. The presentation is led by Cairsti Russell (PhD candidate, University of Glasgow) and will include exclusive clips and stories behind the making of the film.

This will be followed by short presentations and a panel discussion on collaborative, participatory filmmaking, curation and research with Oisin Kealy (PhD candidate, University of Glasgow, exploring Human Rights Film Festivals in the Global South), Ian McDonald (documentary filmmaker and Reader in Film Practice at Newcastle University) and Lucy Parker (documentary filmmaker and Senior Lecturer at Kingston University London).

Facilitated by Alexandra Colta. Supported by Research Collaborative Award, College of Arts, University of Glasgow

Lucy Parker’s film, Solidarity, will be screened on Friday 25 October at 8.15pm in CCA Theatre.

Ian McDonald’s film, Who Is Europe? will be screened on Sunday 27 October at 5.30pm in CCA Theatre.

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Posted: 3 October 2019

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SUPERLUX Seminar with Kate Parker

Booking via Eventbrite
Free for SUPERLUX Members

Join Kate Parker who will present an overview of her work as part of City Projects, a visual arts organisation that commissions and produces Artists’ Moving Image projects with artists which respond critically to their social and political context.

Recent projects include Solidarity by Lucy Parker, a film about blacklisting in the construction industry, that is being screened in Glasgow on Friday 25 October as part of Document. Kate will talk in detail about the development, production and distribution plans of Solidarity (2019).

Earlier this year City Projects published The Politics of Production, a report written by artist Dan Ward which critically examines the current conditions for production of Artists’ Moving Image. Kate will talk about her motivations for publishing it alongside an accompanying text that she wrote in 2016, The Conditions for Artists; Moving Image Production in London Today.

Participants are encouraged to read both texts in advance of the seminar.

City Projects was formed in 2003 and is run by its voluntary management committee  Fani Arampatzidou (chair), Kate Parker (secretary), Louise Shelley (treasurer) Rabz Lansiquot and Taylor Le Melle.

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Posted: 3 October 2019

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Arrows, Gazes, Points of Intensity: The Films of Ana Vaz

Our 2019 artist-in-focus is Ana Vaz, an artist and filmmaker whose films, installations and performances speculate upon the relationships between myth & history, self and other through a cosmology of references and perspectives. Assemblages of found and shot materials, her films combine ethnography and speculation – exploring the f(r)ictions imprinted upon ‘cultivated’ & ‘savage’ environments.

This collection of films proposes a critical reflection on the relationship between colonialism, modernity and the impending ecological disaster – exploring the colonial and post-colonial exchange between Europe and the Americas.

Interrogating the filmmaker’s gaze and relationship to the ‘other’, and through the development of a distinctively “embodied” cinema, Ana’s films explore complex relationships between environments, territories and hybrid histories, pushing the boundaries of our perception. Associations of images, sounds and texts, her works propose a corporeal and subjective experience of being in the world.

Followed by a conversation between Ana and artist Alexander Storey Gordon.

Curated by LUX Scotland

Part of our Artist in Focus: Ana Vaz series, which also includes a presentation by Ana around her upcoming feature film The Voyage Out, Sun 3:30pm

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Posted: 2 October 2019

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Spell Reel

A collective film assembled by Filipa César.

In 2011, an archive of film and audio material re-emerged in Bissau. On the verge of complete ruination, the footage testifies to the birth of Guinean cinema as part of the decolonising vision of Amílcar Cabral, the liberation leader assassinated in 1973. In collaboration with the Guinean filmmakers Sana na N’Hada and Flora Gomes, and many allies, Filipa César imagines a journey where the fragile matter from the past operates as a visionary prism of shrapnel to look through. Digitised in Berlin, screened and live commented, the archive convokes debates, storytelling, and forecasts. From isolated villages in Guinea-Bissau to European capitals, the silent reels are now the place from where people search for antidotes for a world in crisis.

Presented in partnership with Goethe-Institut Glasgow.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Revenir

Part road-trip, part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Revenir follows Kumut Imesh, a refugee from the Ivory Coast now living in France, as he returns to the African continent and attempts to retrace the same journey that he himself took when forced to flee civil war in his country – this time with a camera in his hand.

Traveling alone, Kumut documents his journey both as the main protagonist in front of the camera, as well as the person behind it, revealing the human struggle for freedom and dignity on one of the most dangerous migratory routes in the world. Revenir depicts a courageous journey and a unique collaboration between filmmaker and refugee; which is not without consequences.

Presented in partnership with GRAMNet.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Meteors

At night, in a Kurdish town in eastern Turkey, meteors start to fall. Stepping out of their homes to look, the city’s inhabitants encounter fragments of the past and remember those who have been lost. In this environment, the tracing of absences becomes both an imaginative and a political act; the impact of the violence which has scarred the area has been erased from official records, leaving memories and stories to fill the gaps.

Focusing on the troubled history of this conflict-stricken area, Meteors deftly interweaves its cosmological framework with astute political commentary, exploring the ethics of how we remember the stories, places and voices which have disappeared.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Orione

The death of Alejandro “Ale” Robles, killed by police after being betrayed by a friend, provides the throughline for this nuanced, fragmentary portrait of the Don Orione estate in Buenos Aires. In a small apartment his mother, Ana, bakes a cake and recalls her son whilst home video footage captures the family in happier times.

Through the deft assembly of different types and sources of footage, Bonino weaves together disparate elements of neighbourhood life to construct a multi-layered work that coalesces to form an aching and disquieting portrait of a society spilling over with contradictions and irreconcilable truths.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Kings & Extras: Digging for a Palestinian Image

Palestinian director Azza El Hassan embarks on an intriguing, moving and sometimes humorous road-trip on the trail of a lost archive of films made by the PLO Media Unit, which went missing during the Israeli invasion of Beirut in 1982. The film stock documents 25 years of Palestinian history – often denied or ignored – including the moment of civilian expulsion that occurred during the Six Day War of 1967 and the PLO’s activity in Lebanon up until 1982.

She travels through Palestine, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon, following the contradictory and often confusing clues as to the archive’s whereabouts, all the while prompting a deeper reflection on Middle East politics, Arab life, and the question of what a Palestinian identity means today.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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A.K.A. Serial Killer

A milestone in the history of political and experimental cinema, A.K.A. Serial Killer pioneers the cinematic theory of fûkeiron (the theory of landscape). Together with cultural theorist Matsuda Masao, scriptwriter Sasaki Mamoru and other collaborators, Adachi set out to trace the likely steps of a nineteen-year-old boy who carried out four, apparently motiveless, murders over a month-long period in 1968.

The result is an experimental documentary comprised purely of landscape shots, each of which shows scenery that he may or may not have seen during his upbringing and journey. Seeking an alternative to the sensationalism found in the media, Adachi’s sparse voice-over provides only the hard facts while the increasing number of billboards in the landscapes slowly reveal the hegemony of capitalism in contemporary Japan.

Followed by a Skype conversation with Julian Ross, researcher, writer, and curator for International Film Festival Rotterdam. Julian has also written a programme note to accompany the screening. 

Supported by the BFI and BFI’s Film Audience Network as part of “Uprising: Spirit of ‘68”

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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