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Chaos

“What does it actually mean to describe the whole of society, the state of an era’s consciousness? It doesn’t mean to repeat the words that society uses; it has to be depicted in a different way. And it has to be depicted in a radically different way, because otherwise nobody will ever know what our time was like.”

This quote from Austrian poet and writer Ingeborg Bachmann provides the conceptual framework for Sara Fattahi’s devastating meditation on the war in Syria, as experienced by three women living in exile. The women live in different places, from Damascus to Vienna, but Fattahi binds them together in a cinematic conversation that speaks to the complexity of personal and collective trauma, what it means to live in exile, and the cognitive dissonance that governs the way we perceive conflict. It is a conversation between the interior and exterior – an impossible conversation.

Director Sara Fattahi will take part in a post-screening Q&A.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi and 27 Years without Images

Anabasis – The name given to wandering, circuitous homeward journeys.

Developed in collaboration with legendary filmmaker Adachi Masao, The Anabasis… re-purposes Adachi’s theory of fûkeiron to explore the history of the Japanese Red Army, their exile in Beirut and ultimately their forced return to Japan.

Shot in glorious Super 8mm, Baudelaire traces the disjointed stories and entangled recollections of Fusako Shinegobu, leader and founder of the JRA; her daughter, May; and Adachi Masao, filmmaker-turned-revolutionary fighter. Panoramas of Tokyo and Beirut merge with archival footage, TV clips and film excerpts to create a beautiful and poignant exploration of the slippages between history, memory, politics and cinema.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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The Sun Quartet

How do forty-three students vanish into thin air? Produced by an anonymous Mexican collective, The Sun Quartet is an experimental, at times psychedelic protest-poem addressing the legacy of the 2014 disappearance of forty-three students in Iguala, Guerrero. Across four visually striking and emotionally potent short films, the collective radically depart from the grammar of mainstream film and television, which, along with the obfuscation of the state, police and military continues to fail victims of violent crime in Mexico. The Sun Quartet finds them instead reaching towards a more authentic language capable of articulating the trauma at the heart of the national psyche.

The whereabouts of the disappeared students remain unknown, and their status as ‘disappeared’ persists to this day.

Please note that the film is composed largely of overlaid moving images that at times create a strobe-like effect. 

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Babylonia Mon Amour

Having been evicted from their squats in Barcelona, two groups of Senegalese men float in an apparently endless drift. Unemployed, but proud, they try to make the best of an existence punctuated by harassment from the police and citizens who believe that general Franco would have never allowed such unruly behaviour. It begins to dawn on them that their European dream may be nothing more than an illusion.

Director Pierpaolo Verdecchi captures the rage, tenderness and despair of men existing on society’s b-side. Shot in precise black and white, stylish and observational, the film has the fierce pulse of a hip-hop song and the melancholic feeling of a reggae ballad.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Sara Fattahi | Director Masterclass, with Scottish Documentary Institute *CANCELLED*

Please note: unfortunately Sara Fattahi is unable to travel to Glasgow and this event has been cancelled. We apologise for any inconvenience and are hopeful that this event will be rescheduled in the near future. Sara will take part in an extended conversation with Noe Mendelle of the Scottish Documentary Institute as well as a Q&A following the screening of her film Chaos, which will be shown as scheduled on Saturday evening at 7.45pm – tickets can be booked here: http://www.documentfilmfestival.org/films/chaos/

Document is proud to host the latest in a series of masterclasses presented by Scottish Documentary Institute, allowing audiences to learn from world class filmmakers as they discuss their practice. This year, we’re joined by Sara Fattahi, director of Chaos – the second film in a trilogy that centres the experiences of women and their relationship to conflict, exile and trauma.

Fattahi’s first feature length documentary Coma (2015) was granted the Regard Neuf Award for the Best First Feature Film at Visions du Réel 2015, and the FIPRESCI Award at the Viennale 2015. Chaos was awarded the Pardo d’oro Cineasti del presente at Locarno 2018.

Free but ticketed.

Chaos screens Sat 19:45, Edwin Morgan Studio

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Black Mother

Part film, part baptism, in Black Mother director Khalik Allah brings us on a spiritual exploration through Jamaica. Soaking up its bustling metropolises and tranquil countryside, Allah introduces us to a succession of vividly rendered souls who call this island home. Their candid testimonies create a polyphonic symphony, set against a visual prayer of indelible portraiture. Immersed into the sacred, the profane, and everything in-between, Black Mother channels rebellion and reverence into a deeply personal ode informed by Jamaica’s turbulent history but existing in the urgent present.

Presented in partnership with Africa in Motion Film Festival

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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The Territorial Sea

The Territorial Sea is a programme of recent artist moving image work featuring stories of struggle from sovereign waters. Works by Taus Makhacheva, Forensic Oceanography, and Francisco Rodríguez document tragic maritime passages, variously pointing to the cultures of spectacle, neglect, and cruelty which permit ongoing catastrophe. Mapping the geopolitics of water through re-enactment, surveillance analysis, and oral history, these short films build a portrait of the sea: parts deadly and sublime. Twelve nautical miles from the baseline of a coastal state, the territorial sea is a drifting stage for violent border policy and humanitarian crises.

The Territorial Sea is curated by Marcus Jack, director of Transit Arts, with thanks to Le Fresnoy, Tourcoing; narrative projects, London; and Forensic Architecture.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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70 Years of Nakba | 9 Palestinian Short Films

Join us for a diverse and thought-provoking programme of 9 short films by both emerging and established Palestinian filmmakers. The first part of the programme reflects directly on the events of the Nakba (the 1948 Catastrophe) and the dream of return through animation, oral testimony and digital technology.  The second part explores contemporary experiences, through traditional documentary, docu-drama and the film essay.

Works screened:

Part One: History and exile
– House, Ahmed Saleh, 4m
– Alyasiini, Sahera Dirbas, 22m
– Your father was born 100 years ago and so was the Nakba, Razan Al Salah, 7m

Part Two: Contemporary dreams and realities
– Oslo Syndrome, Ayman Azraq, 6m
– Journey of a Sofa, Alaa Al Ali, 9m
– Twenty Handshakes for Peace, Mahdi Fleifel, 3m
– Message to Obama, Muhannad Salahat, 7m
– Interference, Anim Nayfeh, 11m
– Today they Took my Son, Farah Nabulsi, 8m

The programme will be preceded by new animated short film Sawt (Sound) by Kassem Hawal

Presented by Dr. Anandi Ramamurthy, Reader in Post-Colonial Cultures at Sheffield Hallam University

Followed by a panel discussion with Dr. Anandi Ramamurthy, Kassem Hawal, Razan Madhoon, and Jamal Awar 

The programme is curated by Creative Interruptions, an Arts and Humanities Research Council Project that aims to explore the way in which disenfranchised communities use the arts to have their voice heard.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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A Woman Captured (Critical Forum)

A Woman Captured reveals the shocking phenomenon of modern-day slavery in the heart of Europe. It follows Marish, a 52-year-old Hungarian woman who has been serving as a family housekeeper for a decade, working 20 hours a day without pay. With no ID, no bed to sleep in and only leftover scraps to eat Marish is treated like an animal and forbidden to leave the house without permission. Shot over a period of two years, the film documents the first transformative steps of a journey Marish had long given up hope of making – towards her freedom, dignity and a renewed faith in life.

It is estimated that around 45 million people around the world live in modern slavery. In Hungary alone there are about 22,000.

Also screening:

They Call Us Maids: The Domestic Workers’ Story (Leeds Animation Workshop, UK, 2015)

They Call Us Maids is a short animated film commissioned by Pavilion and produced by Leeds Animation Workshop, in collaboration with Justice for Domestic Workers Leeds. The film draws on the experiences of thousands of women from disadvantaged backgrounds, in countries such as the Philippines, Indonesia, South Asia or Africa, who have to find work abroad to support their families. Employed as maids they work in private homes, often for long hours and low pay.

The Critical Forum panel discussion will take place after the screening at 15.00 in the Silver Room. Free entry. 

Speakers:

  • Sam Poling, Scottish investigative journalist, currently working for BBC Scotland and BBC Panorama.
  • Shan Saba, director of Brightwork, a recruitment business based in Glasgow and founder of the campaign Scotland Against Modern Slavery.
  • Meghan O’Neill, Campaigns and Engagement Officer Oxfam Scotland.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Co-creative Filmmaking – Process, Representation and Ethics

Participatory filmmaking is widely recognised as a method of engaging communities, building confidence, teaching skills and giving voice. Taking a co-creative approach frames people not only as contributors but as influencers, intrinsic to creating authentic collaborative content. In this workshop we will explore the role of filmmaker, contributors and co-creators through the production process of 2 short films: We Journey Together (2017), a short film depicting the story of 4 people and their experience in the asylum process in Scotland and You Play Your Part (2011), charts the experiences of campaigning women on Clydeside, from the Rent Strikes of 1915 to the Campaign for Equal Pay and the Upper Clyde Shipyards work-in.

The workshop, led by Plantation Productions, will feature discussion with Moya Crowley, Creative Director, Chris McGill, freelance filmmaker and Dr. Kirsten MacLeod, filmmaker and Associate Professor at Edinburgh Napier University.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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