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Good Luck

Filmed on Super 16mm between a state-owned underground copper mine in post-war Serbia and an illegal gold mining collective in the tropical heat of Suriname, Good Luck is a non-fiction portrait of men brought together in the pursuit of capital. Neither a simple morality tale nor an indictment of the mining industry, Good Luck is a film that looks at the similarities between two radically different groups of men as they work in isolation on opposite sides of the globe, labouring in the long shadow of a 3,500 year-old extraction process.

Formed between dark and light, cold and heat, North and South, the film immerses its viewer in the precarious natural and social environments of two distinct labour groups so as to better understand the bonds that men share. In a time of global economic turmoil, here is the human foundation of capital, revealed.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Silence is a Falling Body

Augustina Comedi weaves together a complex and moving portrait of her late father Jaime, constructed from more than 100 hours of videotape he recorded as a hobby prior to his untimely death. It seemed as though he recorded everything, although he left only small clues as to the man he was before marrying her mother and the secrets he kept with him.

Interviews with those who knew him reveal fragments of a youth filled with political activism, joyful friendships, and sexuality that never fully bloomed in the repressive social climate of 1980’s Argentina. With equal marriage being introduced in the country in 2010, Comedi’s film is at once a love letter to her father, and also profound thank you to those who sacrificed so much for the freedoms of the next generation.

Presented in partnership with Scottish Queer International Film Festival.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Looking at Others

A short film programme considering the ethics of the gaze, whether that of the tourist, the filmmaker or the audience. In Dennis Stormer’s Looking at Others an American tour guide brings western tourists to visit and ‘experience’ a Roma community, but who benefits from this exchange? And does the filmmaker – and by extension the viewer – stand apart from the camera-wielding tourists he captures? Glasgow-based artist Duncan Campbell’s fictional The Welfare of Tomás Ó Hallissy draws on archive footage and anthropological research into rural Ireland in the 1960s and 70s to explicitly address the responsibility and impact of the documentary filmmaker. Finally, Patrick Bresnan and Ivete Lucas train their camera on ordinary Floridians compelled to photograph a rare sight at Palm Beach International Airport in Roadside Attraction.

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Curated by and presented in partnership with Glasgow Short Film Festival.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Island

Across the water on the island, four individuals experience the end of life. Showing rarely seen and intensely private events, the film follows the progression of illness for each character and, for one, the last days and hours of life, the moment of death, and after death care. A lyrical, slow cinema description of the temporality and phenomena of dying, this film sensitively witnesses the transition away from personhood.

This is a palliative island, the Isle of Wight, an enigmatic landscape where all around rituals persist. In the hospital pathology lab, microscopic close-ups of cancer show the interior of the bodies, our biology, our creatureliness. Death is presented as natural and everyday but also unspeakable and strange.

Director Steven Eastwood will take part in a post-screening discussion on issues raised by the film via Skype.

Presented in partnership with The ALLIANCE; Good Life, Good Death, Good Grief; Health and Social Care Academy; Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Luz Obscura

Susana de Sousa Dias’ Luz Obscura is a beautifully crafted, deeply felt essay-film looking at the legacy of the Portuguese Estado Novo, or New State, led by António Oliveira de Salazar – the longest-lasting right-wing dictatorship in 20th century Europe.

Taking as its starting point photographs taken by the Portuguese political police (1926-1974), the film focuses on the treatment of political opponents to the regime, especially the Portuguese Communist Party. The central story is that of Octávio Pato who was imprisoned and tortured before spending 14 years in hiding, whilst the contemporary recollections of his three children form the soundtrack to this hidden history.

Luz Obscura reflects on how the authoritarian system operated to disrupt intimate family bonds, and how decades of trauma and repression still mould the present.

We’re delighted to be joined at the festival by Director Susana de Sousa Dias for a post-screening Q&A, hosted by Tatiana Heise.

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Posted: 8 November 2018

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Yama – Attack to Attack

Produced at the height of Japan’s economic boom of the 1980’s, Yama documents the struggles of unionised day-labourers in the San’ya district of Tokyo, on the frontlines of a violent class war. It is a film for the workers, intended to function as a weapon in their struggle – one that cost director Sato his life. On 22 December 22 1985, during filming, he was murdered by Yakuza gangsters whom Sato intended to expose for their criminal involvement in the restructuring of the job market. A collective of directors headed by Kyoichi Yamaoka finished the film, before Yamaoka, too, was later murdered.

The dramatic circumstances of the production reflect the explosive nature of the subject: exposing the corruption at the heart of the state, and the brutal exploitation of the types of people Marx called the “reserve army of labour”: day workers, outcasts, the unemployed, foreigners.

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Posted: 2 November 2018

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SUPERLUX Masterclass with Louis Henderson

Join artist Louis Henderson for a SUPERLUX Masterclass in Glasgow that will introduce his practice and recent work.

Henderson will present an ongoing project titled Ouvertures, authored by the artist group The Living and the Dead Ensemble (Atchasou, Léonard Jean Baptiste, Mackenson Bijou, Rossi Jacques Casimir, Dieuvela Cherestal, James Desiris, James Fleurissaint, Louis Henderson, Cynthia Maignan, Olivier Marboeuf and Zakh Turin) that was created in Port-au-Prince in 2017.

Ouvertures questions the contemporary relevance of the Haitian revolution through a series of translation workshops, a play by Édouard Glissant and a feature film improvised by The Living and the Dead Ensemble.

The project engages questions of representation and the telling of history through orality and body gesture. Made between France and Haiti, and developed through collective processes of writing and improvisation, the work attempts ways of filmmaking as anti-colonial method.

The Living and the Dead Ensemble first gathered in July 2017 for the Monsieur Toussaint Sessions workshop at the Centre d’art in Port-au-Prince, where they were working together on translating Monsieur Toussaint (a play by Édouard Glissant) from French to Haitian Kreyol.

Focusing on theatre, cinema, poetry, song, slam and rap, they performed the Kreyol version of the play in the cemetery of Port-au-Prince as part of the Ghetto Biennale 2017.

This event is presented in partnership with LUX Scotland.

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Posted: 2 November 2018

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Cinema of the Palestinian Revolution

Following a research and restoration project conducted by Creative Interruptions, this special screening of five restored films produced during the period of the Palestinian revolution marks an important retrieval of Palestinian revolutionary cinema, following the loss of the PLO Film Unit archive after the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982. Until very recently the whereabouts of the archive were unknown. While it is now clear that the Israeli military seized it, its access is limited and denied to Palestinians. The aim of the restoration project has been to return these films to both a Palestinian and international public – hoping that doing so will encourage a deeper understanding of Palestinian cinema history and the intellectual ideas that influenced the PLO’s Arts and Culture Unit.

Works screened:

  • Zahrat Al-Madain AKA The Flower of all Cities, dir. Ali Siam, cinematography: Hani Jawharieh (7m, 1969)
  • Palestine in the Eye, dir. PLO Film Unit/Mustafa Abu Ali (28m, 1976)
  • The Urgent Call of Palestine, dir. Ismail Shammout (5m, 1973)
  • Glow of Memories, dir. Ismail Shammout  (12m, 1972)
  • Palestinian Identity, dir. Kassem Hawal (40m, 1984)

Introduced by Dr. Anandi Ramamurthy, Reader in Post-Colonial Cultures at Sheffield Hallam University, and followed by a discussion with Anandi and Kassem Hawal, director of Palestinian Identity.

Followed by a conversation with Dr. Anandi Ramamurthy and filmmaker Kassem Hawal

Curated by Creative Interruptions, an Arts and Humanities Research Council Project that aims to explore the way in which disenfranchised communities use the arts to have their voice heard.

Presented in partnership with Creative Interruptions and supported by Film Hub Scotland.

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Posted: 2 November 2018

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Permissible Documentaries: The Non-Fiction Poetics of Ateyyat El Abnoudy

This illustrated talk will further explore El Abnoudy’s socialist poetics and political aesthetics and discuss how she has given shape to Egypt’s documentary tradition. Popularly known as “the mother of Egyptian documentary”, she began her filmmaking career in the early 1970s as one of the key figures of New Arab Cinema, negotiating from the outset what she called “permissible dreams” – the right to foreground the voices of working class Egyptians and take a more intersectional approach to representation. As a pioneer of politically and socially engaged documentary, she influenced many young female filmmakers whilst challenging the male-dominated ruling classes and the similarly homogenous cinematic standards of the time.

This talk is preceded – at 12noon – by Three by Ateyyat El Abnoudy, a screening of three early works from the filmmaker.

Presented by Dr Stefanie Van De Peer, Research Fellow at the University of Exeter

Supported by Film Hub Scotland

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Posted: 2 November 2018

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Three by Ateyyat El Abnoudy

Three early works from the legendary Ateyyat El Abnoudy, perhaps the finest exponent of documentary filmmaking in Egyptian history. Nicknamed ‘the poor people’s filmmaker”, her films focus on the social and economic issues of the Egyptian, Arab and African underclasses, and especially those of women – choices which limited her popular appeal for many years and frequently invited the displeasure of Arab governments. However, her artistry is universally applauded and these works in particular remain beautiful and poignant examples of her ability to articulate both the struggle and the vibrancy of Cairo’s urban landscape.

We present these works as an interrupted screening, pausing between the films to discuss their form and content. Speakers are Sara Shaarawi and Dr. Stefanie Van De Peer.

Works Screened:

  • Horse of Mud  – Egypt, 1971, 12m
  • Sad Song of Touha – Egypt, 1972, 12m
  • The Sandwich – Egypt, 1975, 12m

The screening will be followed by, Permissible Documentaries: The Non-Fiction Poetics of Ateyyat El Abnoudy – at 13:30 – an illustrated talk further exploring El Abnoudy’s socialist poetics and political aesthetics and discuss how she has given shape to Egypt’s documentary tradition.

Presented by Dr Stefanie Van De Peer, Research Fellow at the University of Exeter

Supported by Film Hub Scotland

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Posted: 2 November 2018

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