Tag: Glasgow

Freelance Writing Opportunities

Document and Dardishi are co-editing a publication to be launched at Document Festival 2018, and we are looking for womxn* writers of Palestinian descent/ the diaspora to contribute their work.

Freelance Writing Opportunities
Application Deadline: 5pm, Monday 22nd October 2018.
Fee: £50

The publication will tie in with a series of Palestinian short films which will be screened at Document 2018. We invite submissions from Palestinian womxn that reflect on the idea of a Palestinian archive, particularly from a feminist point of view. We welcome a wide variety of approaches that explore what an archive might be, what forms it might take, and how it might relate to the preservation of histories, cultures and identities that exist under conditions of exile and occupation. This could range from intimate reflections around personal narratives or family histories, to wider critiques of collective memory and historical erasure. We are open to including poetry, prose, illustration and photography, and the publication will form part of a strand of films with a focus on Arab women filmmakers and their approach to representation of Arab life on screen.

In order to apply, please send a copy of your CV and 200 words detailing your submission to info@dardishi.com. If relevant, writing samples and images will also be assessed alongside your application. For examples of work published by Dardishi previously, see www.dardishi.com.

*Our use of the term womxn includes non-binary and intersex people and transwomen.

About us

Document Human Rights Film Festival
30 November – 2 December 2018 at Scottish Youth Theatre, Glasgow

Document Festival is Scotland’s international human rights documentary film festival, established in 2003. It provides a unique platform that attracts Scottish, British and international documentary filmmakers and promotes local and international discussion, cultural exchange and education. By screening the best of recent and historical human rights documentaries, Document is a crucial space for the visibility and consideration of documentary film as an art form and social practice. Recognised at home and abroad, they work with many local, national and international organisations and are members of the Human Rights Film Network.

Over the last 15 years, Document has screened over 600 films, promoting an expansive understanding of human rights to include subjects such as immigration & asylum, women’s rights, war and conflict, self-determination, racism, LGBT rights, miscarriages of justice, eviction, poverty, social exclusion, workers/unemployed rights, mental health & social care, young and older people, human trafficking, indigenous cultures, environmental concerns, global policies and their local consequences, Roma gypsies and travellers, HIV/AIDS, drug trafficking and addiction and disability issues.

 

Dardishi Festival
8 – 10 March 2019 at CCA Glasgow

Dardishi Festival is a community-run artistically ambitious festival that celebrates and showcases Arab and North African womxn’s contributions to contemporary art and culture at CCA Glasgow. The Festival is born out of Dardishi.com, an online publication run by Arab and North African womxn that exclusively platforms art, music and writing by Arab and North African womxn. Dardishi Festival 2019 will take place on March 8th, 9th and 10th 2019, which is International Women’s Day weekend and Dardishi’s 3 year anniversary. Programming for Dardishi Festival 2019 includes poetry, performances, film screenings, live music, creative writing workshops, zine-making and craftivism workshops, and panel discussions from cultural practitioners. Dardishi’s first print issue publication will also be launched on the opening night.

‘Dardishi’, the feminine verb for ‘chitchat’ in Arabic, is indicative of the tone and content of the work we produce – collaborative work that spurs a wider dialogue on Arab womxn’s issues. Through our Festival, we aim to strengthen creative collaboration between the womxn in our community, provide positive and diverse representation of Arab and North African womxn in the arts, and create opportunities that support and develop our professional and creative practices.

Change of Date and Venue for Document 2018

This year’s Festival date and venue have changed: Document Film Festival will now take place from Friday 30 November to Sunday 2 December at the Scottish Youth Theatre in Glasgow’s Merchant City.

We previously announced that the Festival would take place at the CCA in October as usual – however ongoing uncertainty about the venue’s reopening following the lengthy enforced closure caused by the Glasgow School of Art fire in June has made it impossible to proceed with that plan.

We’re delighted to have the support of the Scottish Youth Theatre, who will open their doors to us for a full weekend and allow the majority of our programme to go ahead as planned. It’s an open, friendly and inclusive arts venue in the city centre with impressive and adaptable facilities that will enable the festival to retain its scope and atmosphere. We’re also thankful to our friends at CCA for their support in the past few challenging months and look forward to working with them again in future, and to Creative Scotland and Screen Scotland for their patience and support as we sought a viable solution..

For our 16th edition, we’re hosting three days of film screenings, discussions, lectures and events on human rights issues from around the globe, and on documentary filmmaking as an artform and social practice. As well as striking contemporary features, this year’s festival has a particular focus on archives and archive film, including a strand dedicated to Palestinian identity and the radical women who pioneered New Arab Cinema, the politics and poetics of landscape on film, and a screening and masterclass with renowned artist filmmaker Louis Henderson.

The full programme will be announced in early November. We can’t wait for you to join us and help warm our new home for Document 2018.

Document 2017: Let us know what you thought!

Document 2017 (credit: Stuart Crawford)

It’s only been a week since Document 2017. Thanks to everyone who makes the festival what it is – all our amazing guests, our wonderful collaborators, our incredible volunteers and, of course, the audience.

A particular thanks to everyone who filled in a feedback form over the festival weekend – we value your feedback very much. If you missed your chance then, we’d still love to know what you thought, good or bad, to help us improve the festival. We’ve set up an online survey that will only take a few minutes to complete. It can be found here.

We have more photographs and discussion of the festival to come, so watch this space. Otherwise, the conversation will continue towards our 2018 festival – starting this week, with our screening of Stranger In Paradise at Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh, with director Guido Hendrikx in attendance. More details of that here.

See you soon!

Interview: Zaynê Akyol (Gulîstan, Land of Roses)

Zaynê Akyol’s Gulîstan, Land of Roses is the opening gala film for Document 2017. Akyol’s documentary focuses on the young women of the armed wing of the PKK, the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, which is also an active guerrilla movement. From their camp hidden away in the mountains, the women lead a nomadic life, undergoing ideological and practical training before being sent out to the front lines. Even as fighting against ISIS intensifies in the Middle East, these women bravely continue their battle against barbarism. Offering a window into this largely unknown world, Gulîstan, Land of Roses exposes the hidden face of this highly mediatized war: the female, feminist face.

Zaynê Akyol gave us this exclusive interview ahead of the Document screening.


There’s often an assumption amongst Western commentators that women in the Middle East are forced into subordinate positions, one that this film triumphantly challenges. Was that your original intention?

I was born in Turkey, but my family is Kurdish, and in the village where I was born, the Kurdish guerrillas used to come pay us visits in the 1980s and 1990s. So the PKK fighters were part of my environment from a very early age. Then, when I immigrated to Canada, I met Gulîstan. She was 15 years older than I, but her story was similar. We were from the same small village in Turkey. Both of us were Kurdish and had the same religion: the Alevi branch of Shi’a Islam. I considered Gulîstan my big sister—she was my role model. Then one day, Gulîstan disappeared from my life and went to enlist in the PKK, the Kurdish guerrilla forces. At the time, I really didn’t grasp all the implications of what she was doing, but as time went on, I began to understand the seriousness of it all. In 2000, I learned that she had died. After that, once I had completed my film studies at university, it was natural and necessary for me to make a film about her experience. Or at least to retrace her path through her family, through other women who had fought with the PKK, female guerrillas and her friends from that time. But in 2014, when we went to the autonomous Kurdistan Region in Iraq to shoot this film, our trip coincided with the first strikes by Daesh (ISIS) in the region. So I witnessed the genesis of the conflict. From that point on, the subject of my film was supposed to be these female guerrillas of the PKK, but I think that the film, in its current form, necessarily reveals a side of Gulîstan as well.

It is also a way for me to showcase women who are the hope of millions of people and to humanise those faces that we see and hear about only fleetingly in the media. I wanted to live with them so that I could really understand their lives as combatants in times of war, in the mountains (where their headquarters is) and in the war zones.

Indeed, this guerrilla group proposes to found a society capable of self-governing, advocating a decentralisation of the power of the State. Very critical of existing systems of governance such as capitalism, it proposes to establish a structure in which the people participate directly in decision-making, with fair representation of minorities and gender parity. A society based on religious pluralism, multiculturalism and respect for the environment, in stark contrast to the jihadists. This new community approach is indeed one of the most progressive in this part of the world, where the two factions—the Muslim fundamentalists and the feminist leftists—are fighting.

You gain a remarkable degree of intimacy with the subjects – how easy was it to gain their trust?

I built up trust with the PKK over several years. After having written the first version of my script in 2010, I went to Europe to meet people who had ties to the Kurdish guerrillas. A year later, I decided to go to the autonomous Kurdistan Region of Iraq to meet with the women fighters and do a demo for my grant applications. That time I was able to stay for only a week, because Iran was attacking the PKK’s positions, which made my work dangerous. But I did meet Sozdar, one of the protagonists in my film, and she and I formed a very tight bond. In 2014, I found her and we saw each other again at a temporary camp in Xakurkê, in the northern part of Iraqi Kurdistan, where she and other female guerrillas were preparing to go fight in Sinjar. I didn’t know any of the other women fighters, but they were very cooperative right away. I never sensed any reluctance—quite the contrary! I think it was also because I am a Kurdish woman and was already very familiar with the PKK and their ideology.

This is also due to the fact that in my directing method, I advocate a personal and immersive approach. I immerse myself entirely in the world of my subjects and I always try to blend into their environment.

In order to realise this documentary, I focused on a small group of individuals, paying particular attention to their imagination and personality, that is to say that my protagonists will have the opportunity to suggest when and how they want to be “pictured”. Having used this method, I realised that their suggestions are often surprising and very revealing. This method of joint creation also makes them more open to my propositions and this further solidifies our bonds of trust. Consequently, they are also fully involved in the creative process of the film, and it enriches the film with certain veracity. This way of proceeding allows me to have an honest approach and allows the fighters to reveal themselves, without a filter or intermediary.

There’s a scene where a woman asserts that a married woman lives a life of slavery, and that she feels freer. Do you think that these women, while their lives are subject to military discipline, are in fact freer?

I don’t know about freer, because that’s a pretty hard question to answer. But I can say that these women fighters feel freer in their actions, because they don’t have to live under the kind of patriarchy that is so omnipresent in the Middle East, influenced by culture and religion. I think that the concept of freedom is more of a philosophical issue, because everyone has their own description.

That’s why I would rather tell you what one of these fighters told me. She said, “In these times, feeling free is almost always an illusion. How can I say that I am free when right beside me, people are being killed, women are being assaulted, and children are being subjected to violence? Real freedom is living in a world where we do everything we can so that these things don’t happen. Otherwise, I’m not free, I’m just someone who is afraid and submissive, who closes her eyes to other people’s suffering. A person who deliberately decides not to see anything or do anything. And none of that has anything to do with freedom.”

There’s been much discourse around men and their fetishisation of guns, yet there’s a lovely scene in the film where the women talk about how much they love their weapons. Any thoughts on that?

Personally, I don’t like weapons—quite the contrary. But I’m in no position to preach to them while I’m living comfortably in Canada. These women fighters live in a region that’s in a constant state of war, and if it weren’t for their weapons, they couldn’t defend themselves against the Turkish army, the Iranian army, or even the Syrian army, much less Daesh (ISIS). Their weapons are what protects their lives. Obviously, in our country where things are pretty secure, I don’t think that weapons are necessary.

One voiceover proclaims, “Where does freedom begin? It begins with the woman… She’s the fundamental source of morality”, before attacking capitalism and its subjugation of the individual. How far would you agree with these statements?

I am not a politician and neither a preacher for any ideology. I am a filmmaker trying to understand a particular situation and to be a subjective observer.

Before viewing the film, the viewer might expect something quite grim, yet the film contains quite lyrical passages where the women are enjoying their comradeship and relative freedoms. Did you expect this on making the film?

I think that this kind of comradeship exists in many communities, whether they are armies or any other kinds of groups. You have to understand that all of these women have given up their former lives to go live as soldiers, and they find and recreate a new family within this circle.

Did your views on the PKK’s aims and actions change through filming them?

There are several reasons why I wanted to make this film. First, I wanted to bring the violence and oppression to light that the Kurdish people have been enduring, to make people aware of this little-known reality, to get them interested in learning more about the situation in Kurdistan. The war against Daesh (Islamic State) is new for the PKK. The PKK exist since 1978 and that its members took up arms against the Turkish state in 1984. It was created because the Kurdish people have been living with the denial of their existence for over a century, in addition to being subjected to abuses in the four countries where they live (Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria). We must not forget these people once they have gotten rid of Daesh for us. We must also listen to their claims, which are completely legitimate: to be independent within the countries where they live (for the ones who lives in Turkey, Iran and Syria) and the recognition of Kurdistan as a country (for those in Iraq).

I also wanted to show a different side of women in the Middle East. Not the aspect that is often shown, especially in times of war, as the victim: women crying for their children or their husbands, women who are suffering. Instead, I wanted to show strong women: those who don’t give up without a fight, who are no longer victims of the actions of men—most of the time, it is the men who have started the war—those who stand up for their rights and take up arms when necessary. This may seem like a shocking portrait, because we are used to the image of submissive, caring women. In any case, I think that the fighters in the film break many stereotypes, not only about women in general, but also and especially about women in the Middle East.

Making this film changed me and made me think about things on several levels. At first, for me it was about maintaining ties to my Kurdish roots and reflecting on the state of the world at a time when fighting is increasing in the Middle East and the conflicts are becoming more international. Then, as I met these female guerrillas, I had to face myself and my own beliefs. Through contact with these fighters, I became increasingly aware of the grievances and condition of women in the world.

Brian Beadie


Gulîstan, Land of Roses is the opening gala screening of Document 2017, on Thursday 19th October at CCA Glasgow.

Tickets from CCA: Book online / 0141 352 4900

Gulîstan, Land of Roses

Document 2017: Meet the Jury

There are five films in the international jury competition this year at Document. They are Gulîstan, Land of Roses, Normal Autistic Film, Rat Film, Erase and Forget and 69 Minutes of 86 Days. For Document 2017, we are delighted, not to mention honoured to welcome Laura Ager, Frances Higson, Hannah McHaffie, Mona Rai and Dr Kiki Tianqi Yu to sit on our international jury. The jurors will deliberate together before announcing the winner at our closing gala at CCA, Glasgow on Sunday 22nd October. Here’s a little more about each of them…

Laura Ager

Laura is an independent researcher and culture worker. As a freelance event organiser and film programmer she organises pop-up screenings in Leeds under the name Film Fringe, she is regional co-ordinator for the Scalarama film festival and programmes documentaries for the Leeds International Film Festival and the Hyde Park Picture House. She recently completed her PhD in festivals presented by UK universities and now teaches cultural theory at the University of Leeds. Her research interests include film, history, cultural studies, knowledge exchange, the politics of the cultural economy and non-hierarchical models of organising.

Frances Higson
Frances is currently Project Manager for the FANS Youth Film Festival and Programme Co-ordinator for the Radical Film Network 68 Festival. In previous years Frances has worked extensively as a film maker; she produced the multi-award winning feature films The Magdalene Sisters and Orphans, she has also made several award winning short films and documentaries.  A founding member of Camcorder Guerrillas, a film & video collective that produces short documentary toolkits for campaign groups and organisations working with human rights. She also works in film education mentoring young film making talent and teaches Social Screen, a module she designed and developed at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland.

Hannah McHaffie
Before Hannah joined the Doc/Fest team full time in 2015, she was programming a community film club in Lancashire for a local arts organisation and attended a variety of film film festival. She is a freelance writer for EventBrite UK and runs her own film site, ReelInsights. After two years as Administrative & Executive Assistant with Sheffield Doc/Fest, she has recently been promoted to Programme Coordinator, working across both the Film and Alternate Realities programmes.

Mona Rai

Mona Rai co-founded Document, Scotland’s first human rights film festival, with Paula Larkin in 2003, and coordinated the festival until 2012. Beginning with the intent to counter the aggressive anti-immigrant and Roma narratives in the national press at the time, in the ensuing years Mona oversaw ten successive iterations of the festival and countless screenings, events, panels and collaborations, establishing and growing Document’s international reputation before transitioning to sit on Document’s board as a key guiding force.

Dr Kiki Tianqi YU 
Dr Kiki Tianqi YU is a filmmaker, scholar, and film curator. Originally from China, Kiki studied Film and Sociology at the University of Westminster and the University of Cambridge. Having worked in China, she is currently Lecturer in Filmmaking at the University of the West of Scotland. She is the author of ‘My’ Self On Camera: First Person Documentary Practice in an individualising China (Edinburgh University Press, 2018), and the co-editor of China’s iGeneration: Cinema and Moving Image Culture for the 21st Century (2014). Her films include Photographing Shenzhen (2007), Memory of Home (2009), feature documentary China’s van Goghs (IDFA, 2016) – won four international awards, screened at over 15 film festivals. She’s currently producing a 15 years long term production documentary on transgender in China. She curated ‘Memory Talks – series of personal nonfiction films’ in Shanghai 2017.


The international jury prize will be announced at Document 2017’s closing gala, ahead of the screening of 69 Minutes of 86 Days, Sunday 22nd October at 8pm. More details here.

Director’s Statement: Eldorado XXI

Eldorado XXI is a critical media practice parafiction attempt. Aesthetically similar to the majority of contemporary contemplative cinema the mise‐en-scène is valued allowing the action to unfold in its own rhythm. Drifting organically into non-diegetic orchestrated sequences, the film also lingers on a direct ethnographic cinema fashion approach combining, visual sequences accompanied by off sounds.

The raised question is how can an individual carry his entire family to hell seeking a desired fortune/wishing to break free from poverty? A random lottery promises the awakening of ones oblivion of oneself. An illusion that leads men to self destruction, moved by the same interests, dealt with the same tools and means in contemporaneity as it has been dealt in the ancient times.

The objective and the subjective were displaced, not transformed; the story remained truthful, really truthful instead of fictionally truthful. But the veracity of the story had not stopped being a fiction. The break is not between fiction and reality, but in the new mode of storytelling, which affects both of them. What is opposed to fiction is not the real; it is not the truth; it is the story‐telling function of the poor, in so far as it gives the false the power that makes it into a memory – a legend.

Let us go back to the words of Glenn Gould: “No Man’s Land is the natural land of the imagination.” It is in this non-place where we assemble ourselves to resist to the silence of the universe, in order not to succumb to the pure panic and the threat of dissolution. The silence of the abysses that is strange to us, but to which we do belong, in a piece of us abandoned to the pure possibilities, to the (un)submissive obsessions of any kind, to fear’s inertia, that we are falsely protected by the conventions.

Salomé Lamas


Eldorado XXI screens at Document, 22/10 at 5.30pm

Tickets from CCA: Book online / 0141 352 4900

Eldorado XXI

Document 2017 Festival Passes now on sale!

Weekend and day passes for Document 2017 are now on sale! Festival passes can be exchanged for tickets to any screening or event, subject to availability. NB All tickets are free to refugees, asylum seekers, OAPs and those on income support.

Weekend Passes: £20 (£18) + £1 booking fee
Day Passes: £10 (£8) + £1 booking fee

Weekend pass: Buy now

Friday pass: Buy now

Saturday pass: Buy now

Sunday pass: Buy now

Document 2017 takes place at Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), Glasgow, 350 Sauchiehall St, Glasgow G2 3JD, 0141 352 4900. 

If you have any queries about festival passes, contact us: info@documentfilmfestival.org

Browse our full 2017 programme here: documentfilmfestival.org/programme

Browse our brochure:

Director’s Statement: Left On Purpose

It’s true—some will say that I caused the death of Mayer Vishner. That by telling his story, I gave him permission to take his own life. Others—his doctors and his close friends—tell me that the filming kept him alive, giving him a reason to carry on. Sadly, I believe that both are correct…I extended Mayer’s life while ensuring his death.

I first met Mayer when I was shooting the documentary No Impact Man—the story of a family trying to live in New York City with no environmental impact. Mayer was the only member of the local community garden growing vegetables. In his words, the other gardeners were bourgeois flower growing narcissists. Mayer was a true Greenwich Village character, and to him, everything was political.  A lifelong radical, he grew up resenting the 1950s post-war conformity he was born into and then switched his focus to the fight against the draft and the Vietnam War. Mayer wasn’t content to just march—he organised, strategised, and made his home in the activist community. One of the original Yippies, he was mentored by the legends—Abbie Hoffman, Paul Krassner, and Dave Dellinger. But unlike many, Mayer never stopped protesting. He never stopped fighting with the world.

The mantra of Mayer’s youth was “never trust anyone over 30.” When I met him, he was pushing 60 and struggling with a world in which the revolution never came. I proposed a documentary profile and he opened his life to me. As our friendship solidified, it became clear that Mayer was engaged in serious battles with depression and alcohol. It was six months into filming when he confided to me that he was preparing for his “last political act”—his suicide. Suddenly, this was no longer a short documentary profile—it was life and death.

I had never before been faced with the tragedy of a potential suicide victim, and I was in no way equipped to handle it on my own.  I went with Mayer to his physician and psychiatrist and witnessed as he tried to make the case for his own death to them. Knowing that he was in the care of professionals was essential to my continuing with the project. But I had become part of the story. We’d become close and I didn’t want him to die, but I also understood that he was in tremendous psychic pain. To force him to live in that pain also seemed cruel. The film he wanted me to make had a sad ending, yet the act of filming was keeping him alive. I was stuck. 

I did some research and learned that, although Mayer suffered in his isolation, he was in no way a rare case. The suicide rate for men Mayer’s age has increased almost 50% in the past decade. His generation, the baby boomers, a generation that has had such an impact on the way they’d lived, were now choosing, more and more, to take this unconventional outlook to the way they approached death. As Mayer said: “My suicide is part of a lifelong quest for agency for the species and for myself. And as we grow older, more and more baby boomers will feel the way I do.” 

It is my hope that Left on Purpose can serve as a point of departure for discussions of the issues at the heart of the film that are so often spoken about in hushed tones—if at all. How do we care for a loved one who doesn’t want to live? What does it mean to help someone in pain? There are no easy answers, but it is important to ask the questions. 

Suicide is a tragedy that is never simple and straightforward. For Mayer, I believe there were a number of factors that came together to make ending his life a viable option. Perhaps the most operative factor was his lifelong depression. As a young man he persevered through the difficult times, aided by a close working relationship with his psychiatrist and the support of the community he found in the anti-war movement. By the mid 1970s, the war ended and Mayer’s therapist died in a car accident, leaving him without the support system on which he had so depended. Unmoored, Mayer began to rely more on self-medicating through drugs and alcohol; providing temporary “anesthesia,” but leading to a cycle of depression and dependence that lasted until his death.

Psychologists have long regarded suicide as being contagious — that is, it is a behaviour that is prone to being copied or imitated. Quite a few people in Mayer’s life made the tragic decision to end their own lives. In the late 1970s Mayer’s friend and legendary troubadour of the anti-war movement, Phil Ochs, succumbed to his mental illness and alcohol addition. More impactful in Mayer’s trajectory perhaps was the well-known photo taken in 1971 of young Mayer sitting between Yippie founder Abbie Hoffman and High Times Magazine founder Tom Forcade. Mayer referred to that photo as “two suicides and a procrastinator,” as both Forcade and Mayer’s close friend and mentor Hoffman took their lives. Hoffman’s first wife, as well as his daughter—both of whom Mayer knew well, also killed themselves. I believe that the suicide of these people he was so close to made his decision a real possibility.

Similarly, I believe that Mayer’s politics, while not the cause of his decision to end his life, were clearly a contributing factor. As stated in Left on Purpose, Mayer looked at everything from a political perspective. Mayer defined himself through his freethinking and his rebelliousness. (There was a time when the Hippies in San Francisco tried to “rebrand” themselves as “freemen.”) The fact that suicide is a taboo of church and state no doubt made it more than a personal act for Mayer and turned it into a statement.

Lastly, Mayer also felt an increasing sense of isolation in this age of ever advancing technology. Thought he did still have friends who cared about him deeply, he felt unequipped to be part of the changing social justice movement that had previously so defined his life but that now relied on digital communication. Mayer prided himself on being an organiser. Greenwich Village was just that—a community of people who met in the park, at the bars, clubs and churches. As the age of email and Twitter advanced, Mayer felt more and more disconnected.

Justin Schein


Left On Purpose screens at Document, 22/10 at 4pm.

Tickets from CCA: Book online / 0141 352 4900

Justin Schein will also be taking part in our panel event, The Ethics of the Documentary Filmmaker, 22/10 at 5.30pm.

Left on Purpose

Document 2017: Full Programme Online

Our 2017 programme is now online! There are over 50 screenings, workshops, panels and special events taking place during our main festival weekend from Thursday 19th October until Sunday 22nd October. Full details of those can be found here. Tickets for all screenings and events at CCA Glasgow are available here. Day and weekend passes will soon be available.

We also have special free community screenings across Glasgow in the weeks leading up to our festival weekend. Full details of those here.

Women, Native, Other, part of our Trinh T Minh Ha retrospective, opens at The Pipe Factory, Glasgow on Saturday 7th October. Details here.

Our brochure can be found at locations across the city and Scotland now. You can browse our brochure online at Issuu:

 

PREVIEW: Take One Action Film Festival 2017

Our friends at Take One Action Film Festival launch their 10th anniversary programme this Thursday, 14/09, in Glasgow (Wed 13/09 in Edinburgh). The 2017 programme contains several documentary films screening in Glasgow that caught our eye. Here they are!

An Insignificant Man (Khushboo Ranka, Vinay Shukla, 2016)
Tuesday 19/09, GFT
This documentary focuses on Arvind Kejriwal, the leader of the Common Man’s party and dubbed “the Bernie Sanders of India”. The screening is followed by a discussion exploring the influence of grassroots social movements in shaping the political agenda in India and Scotland, with guests including Robin McAlpine (Common Weal) and Indra Adnan (The Alternative UK).

The Workers Cup (Adam Sobel, 2017)
Thursday 21/09, CCA
This doc follows four migrant workers – four of 1.6 million – who spend their days in slavery-like conditions constructing Qatar’s 2010 World Cup infrastructure and their nights competing in a workers’ football tournament in the same stadiums they help build. After the screening, there will be a discussion (with guests including Suzanne Crimin of Oxfam), focussing on the push towards “decent work” and some of the many international solidarity initiatives challenging systemic inequalities in Qatar and beyond.

Whose Streets? (Sabaah Folayan, 2017)
Friday 22/09, CCA
A document of the transformation undergone in the wake of the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Folayan’s debut mixes original footage, interviews and cellphone footage to provide a vital counterpoint to the mainstream coverage of the ongoing events.  One of the film’s protagonists, Brittany Ferrell will take part in the post-screening discussion.

To End a War (Marc Silver, 2017)
Saturday 23/09, CCA
This intimate, observational documentary explores the peace process in Colombia, with unprecedented access to both political leaders, President Juan Manuel Santos and FARC Chief Commander Timochenko. It’s a behind-the-scenes consideration of an epochal moment in Colombian history, followed by a discussion exploring “what it takes, strategically and spiritually, for a nation of 50 million to move from hatred to forgiveness.”


Take One Action Film Festival runs 13/09-24/09 in venues across Scotland.

Browse Take One Action’s full programme here.

Document teams up with Take One Action to co-present No Place For A Rebel at Scottish Mental Health Arts Festival on Sunday 15th October. Details and tickets here.

Info

Posted: 11 September 2017